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Raising money for Transforming Lives book by Sue Cansdale

Raising funds in memory of Hassan


A MULTICULTURAL fun day will help fund a book dedicated to the memory of a toddler who died while waiting for a heart transplant. Funds raised from yesterday’s second annual multicultural event at Greystone Community Centre, Carlisle, will go towards printing more copies of Transforming Lives, which tells the moving story of Shanaz and Yasir Malik, whose two-year-old Carlisle son Hassan died from his heart condition this year. http://legacyoflife.org.uk/news.html

 


In Hassan’s memory

A MULTICULTURAL fun day will help fund a book dedicated to the memory of a toddler who died while waiting for a heart transplant. Funds raised from yesterday’s second annual multicultural event at Greystone Community Centre, Carlisle, will go towards printing more copies of Transforming Lives, a book celebrating the achievements of people who have donated organs or undergone transplants. The book tells the moving story of Shanaz and Yasir Malik, whose two-year-old Carlisle son Hassan died from his serious heart condition this year. It has been compiled and written by Sue Cansdale over the past 18 months. Eight years ago, she lost her 22-year-old daughter Zoe in a motorbike accident. She found some comfort in knowing that Zoe’s heart valves and cornea transformed the lives of three children.


“We’ve had a letter from a man in prison, where the book is in their library, sending his condolences to Shanaz and Yasir and saying he wants to be a donor now. That is very gratifying,” she said. “If the book can help just one child like Hassan it will be worth it.” Shanaz and Yasir attended yesterday’s event. It was organised by Saj Ghafoor, whose husband Abdul had a successful kidney transplant in 1998. Almost 100 people at the fun day were treated to Nigerian dancers, a magician and African hair braiding. Proceeds will also set up an Asian’s women group in Carlisle.


Mrs Ghafoor, who opened the HDM Spice Shop in Brook Street in January 2005, said: “There are so many cultures here today – people from Nigeria, India, Ghana, Bangladesh and Pakistan. This is about socialising, which is limited for ethnic minorities here. This brings everyone together.” Father Kevan Dorgan, of St Margaret Mary’s Church in Currock, showed a passion for Indian cuisine when he demonstrated how to make a prawn bhuna. The aroma of cumin and coriander drifted through the air amidst the vibrantly-coloured silk saris hanging from the ceiling. A demonstration of tabla playing showed the Indian percussion instrument played by priests in Sikh temples during prayer.Saj’s daughter Rehma Ghafoor, 14, of London Road, wore a bright blue and pink salwar kameez – a long shirt with loose trousers – and the long scarf called a dupatta.She is the envy of her Trinity School classmates on non-uniform days. Jessica Wilkinson, 14, of Stanwix, said: “We get really jealous because they wear sparkly stuff and we’re just there in jeans and a T-shirt. It is really helpful when we’re studying different religions in RS, we can help each other out.” Carys Wilkinson, 14, of Stanwix, said: “Some people give her funny looks but I think it’s great. If there was an Indian fashion shop here, I would shop there.” Rosie Mills, 15, of Stanwix, said: “It makes it much more interesting to have friends of different cultures.”

 

Julie Armstrong

Published by http://www.newsandstar.co.uk

 

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